Coronavirus - patients who need shielding from coronavirus

Updated 11th July 2020

 
Thank you to everyone in our community for working together and protecting each other through maintaining physical distancing, good hand hygiene and staying at home as much as possible.  It has been hard but your commitment to this is appreciated.  Through our collective efforts we have reduced but not eliminated the coronavirus. We need to continue to  work together to stay safe in Frome as the lockdown is eased.
 
The government has updated it's advice about coronavirus, as follows: 

There are three simple actions we must all do to keep on protecting each other:

  • WASH HANDS – keep washing your hands regularly
  • COVER FACE – wear a face covering in enclosed spaces
  • MAKE SPACE – stay at least 2 metres apart, or 1 metre with a face covering or other precautions

If you have coronavirus symptoms get a test now and do not leave home for at least 10 days after your test. Symptoms are:

  • a high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)
  • a new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)
  • a loss of, or change to, your sense of smell or taste - this means you've noticed you cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal

CLICK HERE FOR CORONAVIRUS FAQ ON WHAT WE CAN NOW DO 

NHS CORONAVIRUS INFORMATION

INFORMATION ON CORONAVIRUS IN DIFFERENT FORMATS

ADVICE ON SELF ISOLATING FOR HOUSEHOLDS WITH POSSIBLE CORONAVIRUS INFECTION

NHS 111 ONLINE CORONAVIRUS SERVICE

 
If you have symptoms of coronavirus, stay at home. Do not visit a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital. 
 

Shielding and protecting patients from coronavirus 

The government has updated its guidance for people who are shielding. You can read the full guidance here. 

The headlines from the updated guidance are: 

  • You may now choose to leave your home, as long as you are able to maintain strict social distancing.
  • If you choose to spend time outdoors, you may do so with members of your own household.
  • If you live alone, you can spend time outdoors with one person from another household. Ideally, this should be the same person each time.
  • If you do go out, you should take extra care to minimise contact with others by keeping 2 metres apart. This guidance will be kept under regular review.

Furthermore, from 1st August the government has indicated that shielding will be paused. This means: 

  • You can go to work, if you cannot work from home, as long as the business is COVID-safe.
  • Children who are clinically extremely vulnerable can return to their education settings if they are eligible and in line with their peers. Where possible children should practise frequent hand washing and social distancing.
  • You can go outside to buy food, to places of worship and for exercise but you should maintain strict social distancing.
  • You should remain cautious as you are still at risk of severe illness if you catch coronavirus, so the advice is to stay at home where possible and, if you do go out, follow strict social distancing.

You can read the full guidance on shielding and proteting people who are clinically extremely vulnerably from coronavirus on the government website. 

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL GUIDANCE

 

People falling into this group include: 

  1. Solid organ transplant recipients
  2. People with specific cancers:
    • people with cancer who are undergoing active chemotherapy or radical radiotherapy for lung cancer
    • people with cancers of the blood or bone marrow such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma who are at any stage of treatment
    • people having immunotherapy or other continuing antibody treatments for cancer
    • people having other targeted cancer treatments which can affect the immune system, such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors
    • people who have had bone marrow or stem cell transplants in the last 6 months, or who are still taking immunosuppression drugs
  3. People with severe respiratory conditions including all cystic fibrosis, severe asthma and severe COPD
  4. People with rare diseases and inborn errors of metabolism that significantly increase the risk of infections (such as SCID, homozygous sickle cell)
  5. People on immunosuppression therapies sufficient to significantly increase risk of infection
  6. Women who are pregnant with significant heart disease, congenital or acquired
 

You are not clinically extremely vulnerable if:

  • you do not have any of the conditions that make you clinically extremely vulnerable
  • you have not been told by your GP or specialist that you are clinically extremely vulnerable or received a letter

If you are not clinically extremely vulnerable you should follow the guidance on staying alert and safe (social distancing).

 

Local support and information for people who are shielding

We have put together some information on local and national support available to people who need to shield. 

CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE INFORMATION ON LOCAL SUPPORT